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. bill yes indeed. president obama in michigan, joining the fight against the right-to-work legislation. good morning everybody. it is tuesday december 11. you're watching the full-court press here on current tv and you're listening to it on your local talk radio station and on sirius x.m. this hour. welcome, welcome, welcome to the program. here we go as we tackle the issues of the day here on this tuesday, december 11. and, of course, give. >> chance to get involved in the conversation. not just to hear what's going on but to talk about what it means to you. you can follow us on twitter at bpshow and we'll read a lot of your comments on the air. you can follow us on facebook. facebook.com/billpressshow. you can give us a call at 1-866-55-press and you can join the chat room yourself and talk to other listeners and viewers to the program this morning across the nation. go to current.com. follow the click to the chat room and you are in. you're look good this morning. good to have you on board with te
of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
at what is happening in michigan, thousands of union supporters turned out on the steps of the capitol to protest right to work measures. the measure passed. taking a look at the front page of "the detroit free press," "the law that is not over." "unions will not go down without a fight. recall efforts and legal challenges are possible." there you can see a union representative struggling with michigan state police yesterday over right to work legislation. here is the story -- host: "the washington post" has a map of right to work law states. "the wall street journal" take a look -- takes a look at which states are the most union heavy. the biggest ones are new york, alaska, hawaii, and washington. michigan comes right in behind washington. which is why "the wall street journal" goes with the headline that this is a blow in a particularly union dominated state. looking at some other news, this one out of the south, for "the new york times," "the gop control in north carolina, with a republican controlled legislature, long a politically moderate player will soon have its most conservati
that we get our economy in full gear. wand that i yield to mr. levin. >> the gentleman from michigan. >> i did not know i would follow the distinguished majority leader. i just want to say i mostly want to talk about plan c but for him or anybody else to come on the floor and say the president hasn't proposed spending cuts, it isn't true and it undercuts the necessary level of trust to find common ground. that kind of a statement should not be made. i said in the rules committee for three hours, participated for two last night. there was no reference to plan c. and it came up just a few minutes secretly before midnight. the purpose of plan c is to try to get votes for plan b twn republican conference. and what it does is to undermine the affordable care act by eliminating the protections and it would result in the loss of health insurance coverage for 420,000 people. it would repeal the block grant, is social services block grant, services for millions of americans and it wasn't machine years ago when chairman camp wrote ssg has been a key source of funding -- of flexible funding for criti
cases not so substantially change this bill. and i thank the senator from michigan for yielding just a minute. i know the senator from new york wants to respond as well. but generally i want to say i know the senator from oklahoma is very sincere. no one literally in this chamber has worked harder to try to put more reforms and eliminate duplication. but i want to just say one thing in response. when we have emergencies in this country like when we go to war, no one comes to the floor to debate how we're going to offset $1.4 trillion worth of expense for two wars, iraq and afghanistan. when we came to the floor a couple of years ago to vote for tax cuts, many of us claimed and said at the time there would not be enough known tkhoefrpl. we had to borrow money to do that. the other side sat quietly and didn't say a word. why is it when americans, when a building is blown up in oklahoma or when the levees break in louisiana or when the worst storm in 50 years comes we have to debate an offset? this bill is not going to be offset. it's going to pass, i hope. and i understand senator cobu
was elected. i think we need to chase that. host: fifth let's hear from me now from midland, michigan. caller: i think it looks pretty good. i do not know how they are going to print out all of the new tax forms by the time we go to fill out our taxes. i am a republican and a bit less than $15,000 a year. i will pick up a beer can or a beer bottle when i am going down the street. most definitely. i have to collect them some days just to get by. as far as kicking the can of the road, i believe -- i do not believe in that. i think republicans have to face the fact that the conservatives always believe in a balanced budget. they always do. they have to scale down the monstrosity of a government they have. host: a reminder to all of our callers, please keep the sound of doubt on your tv set at home. -- keep the sound down on your tv set at home. here is a short piece from the interview on why the senator is leaving office. [video clip] >> many reasons. i have served here 20 years. less than 5 percent have serve that long. some of it is i am tired of living out of a suitcase. i miss 80% of my wife
oversight. host: in michigan, lawrence is a democrat prepared -- a democrat. caller: as far as all the security and coverage that we have for mental health issues, will there be any more money coming from homeland security for mental health issues? we need better coverage. host: lawrence, before we let you go, do you have any sense how your local community uses, and security grant? what michigan does with the money gets from the federal government? caller: i do know we have politicians the do their best. what exactly do, i'm not sure. guest: the issue of mental health is certainly a major one facing the u.s. ran out and what happened with the tragic incidents as last week underscored the need some for mental health. -- the need for mental health. health and human services, hhs, has units that help state allen local communities address their mental health issues. host: do citizens generally have an idea what their states are using the homeland security grants for? is it on the website or their clearing houses? guest: we issued a report earlier this year that looked specifically at t
, they are on the brink. we need to put some value into products and sell them here. host: mike from michigan offering his remedies to help fix the situation in the country. here is built king's take -- bill king on twitter. another story from "the washington post" -- you can read the full story on the unproductive 112th congress in today's washington post. it's good to jump from antenna on the republican line. caller: good morning, america. balancedalking about budgets and all these different things that we should be doing to help the country. i believe that the pier problem is the federal reserve. any country that has had a central bank and up failing and collapsing. we are no different than any other country. the loan us money and interest and we cannot pay it back. we have been doing that since around world war room one. host: regardless of what happens in 48 hours in the negotiations, you do not think we are dealing with the real issue? caller: yes, sir. we have to go back to american banks, not a central bank. until we do that, we will end up and voting on ourselves. it would be better to do it now
months in the house. i think it is terrible to treat the american people that way. being from michigan, we are going through a real challenge here from our hitler governor that you have seen in the news. he wants to take us to a right to work state. we all know what happens. wages go down, no benefits. you work and work and work to make the owner rich and the worker sufferers. -- i do think we need to go over the fiscal cliff. host: here is the story from the "new york times" today. we are talking about the fiscal cliff negotiations and whether compromise or sticking to principles should be what members of congress and the president should do here. a couple of weets this morning. when leaders say -- when people say leaders should stick to their principles, they mean leaders should stick to my principles. a lot of columns this morning talking about this issue, the ongoing fiscal cliff negotiations. here is "the washington post." we are taking your thoughts on the issue. but gutted the independent line. welcome to the "washington journal." caller: i agree also with a caller on the democr
: philip. michigan. democratic caller. caller: thank you. this is not so much a tax question. i used to work for a food company in 1972 that was very large, employing 3000 or more, closing in 1985. people here have lost their jobs. why does the government not do something to cut their jobs? for instance, do we really need the cia, the federal marshals here and there? why do they not get the federal bureau to cover everything? host: that is philip's idea. on twitter, a follow-up with the small-business owner we heard from, saying they eliminated business averaging which is hopeful to small businesses with fluctuating income. guest: it guest: under income averaging, if you have a fluctuating in a come -- income, you pay low rates when your income is low, high rates when your income is high. the average maybe higher than if you had constant and come over that time. income averaging the be the ability to average over years and pay tax at a rate equal to the harvard marginal rates that would apply to your average income. it was an attempt to address the fluctuating income problem. host: m
michigan. caller: my heart really bleeds for the former who owns a multimillion-dollar estate and is wary about his one cowboy that he employs. i think that is what is wrong with this system. it is greed. host: "the new york times" is reporting this morning possibly republicans considering extending tax cuts for middle class americans. "the new york times" is reporting this -- host: any fallback plan from republicans does not include a plan for the estate tax. guest: there is no easy solution to what is happening right now. the senate passed their tax bill over the summer. it was going to include an estate tax extension, as well. $3.5 million exemption. it was not put into the bill. the bill will do with a lot of things that are expiring but the estate tax will be left where was. that will be hanging out there. congress cannot let it hang out there for long. it shouldn't be at the level it was in 2001. it shows you how many things are hanging out there. even if fallback plan -- host: back to the capital gains tax on twitter. what does he mean by capital formation? guest: you want to encou
, it's a large manufacturing state. we've got a big obstacle in the way with lake michigan to get product to the east coast. so i recognize there's need for investment. but i often hear from my constituents the concern of the government, of the federal government picking regions of the country to win and lose in the economic battles that take place between states. in other words, if we invest a lot of money in the northeast quarter's federal taxpayer or a lot of money in california, the fax payer in -- taxpayer in wisconsin is wondering are we just making those states more competitive to compete against wisconsin manufacturing? could you talk a little bit about how the whole thing plays together and what the answer should be? >> first of all, i know you know this, but you all were in the ball game. >> yeah. i'm not making the statement on -- >> i know you're not. i'm saying if you feel your state is disadvantaged, it's not because of us. we wanted to make investments, we were ready to make investments. >> let's take it from montana. let's just take it from a different region becau
on religion and whether it and loved politics. loraine and michigan. republican number. caller: it influences my voting because -- acs, like before, that is a religion. i should have a right to vote with our savior. a country founded on the bible is not a country at all -- makes it very clear. you have to have your belief system. without it, i think a that will exist. host: kathleen, of riverside, ohio. democratic caller. caller: i grew up catholic and went to catholic school but i am no longer a catholic. i would not define myself as a catholic. i got into comparative religious studies in college. i found that my core value system was based -- or still is based on some of the religious or spiritual values i learned of the catholic church and also by studying other religions. and i found some of those core values very similar to things in the competition about fairness and justice. so, i do find that those motivating factors are my core values learned within the catholic church and unions and actually reading the constitution, they are very similar. and i find myself looking at them -- lookin
: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. i want to take just a moment to thank our distinguished colleague and my dear friend for his wonderful service. we serve on the one hand three committees together. it's been my honor to serve on the committee that senator conrad chairs, the budget committee, and to have him serve as a senior member of the agriculture committee, which i chair, and to have both of us sit on the finance committee together. today he has done what he has always done for us, which is to provide vision, common sense, intelligence, and a lot of numbers. and they add up, and they make sense, and so in listening to senator conrad's farewell speech, i want to thank him again for giving us a path forward. this is someone who will forever be in the senate history record as one of the great statesmen of our country, someone with intelligence, respect on both sides, compassion, a fighter from north dakota like i've never seen, and someone who serves in the best tradition of what it means to be an honorable public servant. and so he's been a role model for m
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14